Home > U.S. presidential campaign slogans

U.S. presidential campaign slogans

U.S. Presidential Campaign Slogans.jpg

1840–96

1840

"Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" – 1840 U.S. presidential slogan of William Henry Harrison.[1] Tippecanoe was a famous 1811 battle in which Harrison defeated Tecumseh; John Tyler was Harrison's running mate.

"Independent Treasury and Liberty" – Martin Van Buren[2]

1844

"54-40 or Fight" – James K. Polk, highlighting his position on resolving the oregon Territory boundary dispute with the Russian Empire and the United Kingdom.[3]

"Reannexation of Texas and Reoccupation of oregon"[4] – James K. Polk, drawing attention to his stand on Texas annexation and the oregon boundary question.

"Who is James K. Polk?"[4] – Henry Clay, suggesting that Polk was unknown, and so inexperienced and unqualified.

"Hurrah! Hurrah! The Country's Risin', for Henry Clay and Frelinghuysen!" – Henry Clay and running mate Theodore Frelinghuysen.[5][6]

1848

"For President of the People"[4] – Zachary Taylor

"The Sub Treasury and the Tariff of '46" – Lewis Cass

1852

"We Polked you in '44, We shall Pierce you in '52" – 1852 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Pierce; the '44 referred to the 1844 election of James K. Polk as president.

"The Hero of many battles." – Winfield Scott

"First in war, first in peace" – Winfield Scott

1856

"Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, Fremont" – 1856 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John Fremont

"Fremont and freedom" – John Fremont

"We'll Buck 'em in '56" – James Buchanan, playing on "Old Buck", the nickname associated with his last name. (Also "We Po'ked 'em in '44, we Pierced 'em in '52, and we'll Buck 'em in '56". See Franklin Pierce, 1852.)

1860

"Vote yourself a farm and horses" – Abraham Lincoln, referencing Republican support for a law granting homesteads on the American frontier areas of the West.

"Honest old Abe" – Abraham Lincoln

"The Union must and shall be preserved!" – Abraham Lincoln

"Protection to American industry" – Abraham Lincoln

"True to the Union and the Constitution to the last." – Stephen A. Douglas

"The champion of popular sovereignty." – Stephen A. Douglas

"The Union now and forever" – Stephen A. Douglas

The Union and the Constitution" – John Bell (Also "John Bell and the Constitution", and "The Union, the Constitution, and the enforcement of the laws.")

1864

"Don't change horses in midstream" – Abraham Lincoln.

"Union, liberty, peace" – Abraham Lincoln

"For Union and Constitution" – Abraham Lincoln (Also "The Union and the Constitution")

"An honorable, permanent and happy peace." – George B. McClellan

1868

"Let Us Have Peace" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant

"Vote as You Shot" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant

"Peace, Union, and constitutional government." – Horatio Seymour

1872

"Grant Us Another Term" – Ulysses S. Grant[7]

"Turn the Rascals Out" – 1872 Horace Greeley slogan against Grantism.

"Universal amnesty, impartial suffrage" – Greeley slogan showing support for reconciling with former members of the Confederacy.

1876

"Tilden and Reform" – Samuel Tilden

"Honest Sam Tilden" – Samuel Tilden

"Tilden or Blood!" – 1877 slogan of Tilden supporters during conflict that led to the Compromise of 1877

"Hayes the true and Wheeler too" – Slogan and campaign song title for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler, with song adapted from 1840's "Tippecanoe and Tyler too".

"The boys in blue vote for Hayes and Wheeler" – Hayes appeal to fellow Union Army veterans.

1884

"Rum, Romanism and Rebellion" – Republican attack because of supposed Democratic support for consuming alcoholic beverages, Catholic immigrants, and the Confederacy.

"Ma, Ma, where's my Pa?" – Used by James G. Blaine supporters against Grover Cleveland. The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added "Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!"

"Burn this letter!" – Cleveland supporters' attack on Blaine's supposed corruption, quoting a line from Blaine correspondence that became public.

"Tell the Truth!" – Cleveland's advice to his supporters after the allegations of his illegitimate child came to light.

"Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the state of Maine!" – Cleveland campaign attack on Blaine's alleged corruption in office.

1888

"Rejuvenated Republicanism"[4] – Benjamin Harrison

"Grandfather's hat fits Ben!"[8] – Benjamin Harrison, referring to his grandfather, William Henry Harrison

"Unnecessary taxation oppresses industry." – Grover Cleveland

"Reduce the tariff on necessaries of life." – Grover Cleveland

1892

"Our choice: Cleve and Steve." – Grover Cleveland and Adlai Stevenson

"Tariff Reform" – Grover Cleveland

"No Force Bill." – Grover Cleveland (To which southern Democrats appended "No Negro Domination!")

"Harrison and Protection." – Benjamin Harrison

"Protection-Reciprocity-Honest Money." – Benjamin Harrison

1896

"Patriotism, Protection, and Prosperity"[4] – William McKinley

"No Cross of Gold, No Crown of Thorns." – William Jennings Bryan

1900–96

1900

"Four more years of the full dinner pail" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley

"Let Well Enough Alone" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley

"Liberty. Justice. Humanity." – William Jennings Bryan

"Equal Rights to All, Special Privileges to None" – William Jennings Bryan

1904

"To Assure Continued Prosperity" – Theodore Roosevelt

"National Unity. Prosperity. Advancement." – Theodore Roosevelt

"The People's Choice" – Alton B. Parker

1908

"A Square Deal For All" – William Howard Taft

"Facing the Future" – William Jennings Bryan

1912

"It is nothing but fair to leave Taft in the chair" – William Howard Taft

"Win with Wilson" – Woodrow Wilson

"Vote for 8 Hour Wilson" – Woodrow Wilson

"I am for Wilson and an 8 Hour Day" – Woodrow Wilson

"The man of the eight hour day" – Woodrow Wilson

"A Square Deal All Around" – Theodore Roosevelt

1916

"America First and America Efficient" – Charles Evans Hughes

"He has kept us out of war." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

"He proved the pen mightier than the sword." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

"War in the East, Peace in the West, Thank God for Woodrow Wilson." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

"War in Europe – Peace in America – God Bless Wilson" – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

1920

"Return to normalcy" – 1920 U.S. presidential campaign theme of Warren G. Harding, referring to returning to normal times following World War I.

"America First" - 1920 US presidential campaign theme of Warren G. Harding, tapping into isolationist and anti-immigrant sentiment after World War I.[9]

"Peace. Progress. Prosperity." – James M. Cox

1924

"Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" – The 1924 presidential campaign slogan of Calvin Coolidge.

"Honest Days With Davis" – John W. Davis (Usually used in conjunction with an illustration of Teapot Rock to highlight the Teapot Dome scandal.)

1928

"Who but Hoover?" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.[10]

"A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover[11]

"Honest. Able. Fearless." – Al Smith

"All for 'Al' and 'Al' for All." – Al Smith

"Make your wet dreams come true." – Al Smith, referring to his stand in favor of repealing Prohibition.

1932

"Happy Days Are Here Again" – 1932 slogan by Democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt.

"We are turning the corner" – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover.

1936

"Defeat the New Deal and Its Reckless Spending" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon

"Let's Get Another Deck" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon, using a card game metaphor to answer the "new deal" cards metaphor of Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Let's Make It a Landon-Slide" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon

"Life, Liberty, and Landon" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon

"Remember Hoover!" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Forward with Roosevelt" – Franklin Roosevelt

1940

"No Third Term" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

"No Fourth Term Either" – Wendell Willkie

"Roosevelt for Ex-President" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell Willkie

"There's No Indispensable Man" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

"We Want Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

"Win with Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

"Better A Third Termer than a Third Rater" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt

"I Want Roosevelt Again!" – Franklin Roosevelt

"Willkie for the Millionaires, Roosevelt for the Millions" – Franklin Roosevelt

"Carry on with Roosevelt" – Franklin Roosevelt

1944

"Don't swap horses in midstream" – 1944 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Roosevelt. The slogan was also used by Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.

"We are going to win this war and the peace that follows" – 1944 campaign slogan in the midst of World War II by Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Dewey or don't we" – Thomas E. Dewey

1948


"I'm Just Wild About Harry"

MENU0:00

Instrumental version of "I'm Just Wild About Harry" recorded May 17, 1922. Duration 3:54.

Problems playing this file? See media help.

"I'm just wild about Harry" – 1948 U.S. presidential slogan of Harry S. Truman, taken from a 1921 popular song title written by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake

"Pour it on 'em, Harry!" – 1948 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Harry S. Truman

"Give Em Hell, Harry!" – Harry Truman (After a man shouted it during one of his whistle stop railroad tours)

"Dew it with Dewey" – Thomas E. Dewey

"Win with Dewey" – Thomas E. Dewey

"Get in the fight for states' rights – Strom Thurmond

"Work with Wallace" – Henry A. Wallace

"Work for Peace" – Henry A. Wallace

1952

"I like Ike" – 1952 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

"All the Way With Adlai" – Adlai Stevenson

"Forward with Stevenson-Sparkman" – Adlai Stevenson and John Sparkman

1956

"I still like Ike" – 1956 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower

"Peace and Prosperity" – 1956 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower

"Adlai and Estes – The Bestest" – Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver

"The Winning Team" – Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver

1960

"A time for greatness 1960" – U.S. presidential campaign theme of John F. Kennedy (Kennedy also used "We Can Do Better" and "Leadership for the 60s").

"For the future" – Richard Nixon

1964

"All the way with LBJ" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson

"In Your Heart, You Know He's Right" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barry Goldwater

"In Your Guts, You Know He's Nuts" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson supporters, answering Goldwater's slogan

1968

"Some People Talk Change, Others Cause It" – Hubert Humphrey, 1968

"This time, vote like your whole world depended on it" – (1968) slogan of Richard Nixon, written by Norman Herwood.

"To Begin Anew..." – Eugene McCarthy 1968[12]

"Nixon's the One" – Richard M. Nixon, 1968

1972

"Nixon Now" – Richard M. Nixon, 1972[13] (also, "Nixon Now, More than Ever")

"Come home, America" – George McGovern, 1972[14]

"Acid, Amnesty, and Abortion for All" – 1972 anti-Democratic Party slogan, from a statement made to reporter Bob Novak by Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (as related in Novak's 2007 memoir, Prince of Darkness)

"Dick Nixon Before He Dicks You" – Popular anti-Nixon slogan, 1972[15]

"They can't lick our Dick" – Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[16]

"Don't change Dicks in the midst of a screw, vote for Nixon in '72" – Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[16]

"Unbought and Unbossed" - official campaign slogan for Shirley Chisolm

1976

"He's making us proud again" – Gerald Ford

"Not Just Peanuts" – Jimmy Carter[4]

"A Leader, for a Change" (also "Leaders, for a Change") – Jimmy Carter

"Why not the Best?" – Jimmy Carter

"Peaches And Cream" - Jimmy Carter (from Georgia) and running mate Walter Mondale (from Minnesota)

1980

"Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago?" – Ronald Reagan

"Let's Make America Great Again" – Ronald Reagan

"A Tested and Trustworthy Team" – Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale

1984

"It's Morning Again in America" – Ronald Reagan

"For New Leadership" (also "America Needs New Leadership") – Walter Mondale

"Where's the beef?" – Walter Mondale. An advertising slogan used by the restaurant chain Wendy's to imply that its competitors served sandwiches with relatively small contents of beef. Used by Mondale to imply that the program policies of rival candidate Gary Hart lacked actual substance.

1988

"A Leader for America" – Bob Dole

"Kinder, Gentler Nation" – George H. W. Bush[4]

Thousand Points of Light – George H. W. Bush

"Read My Lips, No New Taxes" – George H. W. Bush

"On Your Side" – Mike Dukakis

"Keep Hope Alive" – Jesse Jackson

1992

"For People, for a Change" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton

"It's Time to Change America" – a theme of the 1992 U.S. presidential campaign of Bill Clinton

"Putting People First" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton

"It's the economy, stupid" – originally intended for an internal audience it became the de facto slogan for the Bill Clinton campaign

"Stand by the President" – George H. W. Bush

"A Proud Tradition" – George H. W. Bush

"Don't Change the Team in the Middle of the Stream" – George H. W. Bush and Dan Quayle

"America First" – Pat Buchanan

"Down with King George" – Pat Buchanan, in reference to Bush

"Send Bush a Message" – Pat Buchanan

"Conservative of the Heart" – Pat Buchanan

"A Voice for the Voiceless" – Pat Buchanan

"Ross for Boss" – Ross Perot

"I'm Ross, and you're the Boss!" – Ross Perot

"Leadership for a Change – Ross Perot

1996

"Building a bridge to the twenty-first century" – Bill Clinton

"Bob Dole. A Better Man. For a Better America." or "The Better Man for a Better America" – Bob Dole

"Go Pat Go" – Pat Buchanan

2000–present

2000

"Leadership for the New Millennium" – Al Gore presidential campaign

"Prosperity and Progress" – alternative slogan of the Al Gore presidential campaign

"Compassionate Conservatism" – George W. Bush presidential campaign

"Reformer with Results" – George W. Bush presidential campaign

2004

"A Safer World and a More Hopeful America" – George W. Bush presidential campaign

"A Stronger America" – John Kerry 2004

"Let America Be America Again" – John Kerry presidential campaign alternative slogan

"Dean for America" – Howard Dean campaign slogan

2008

"Yes We Can " – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008

"We are the ones we've been waiting for." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign rallying cry of Barack Obama during the Democratic convention in Denver.

"Change We Can Believe In." Also, simply: "Change." – 2008 US presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama

"Change We Need." and "Change." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.

"Fired up! Ready to go!" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008

"Hope" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.

"Country First" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John McCain

"Reform, prosperity and peace" – 2008 U.S. Presidential motto of John McCain.[17][18]

"People Fighting Back", and "We'll fight back" – Ralph Nader campaign slogan

"Ready for change, ready to lead" – Hillary Clinton campaign slogan, also "Big Challenges, Real Solutions: Time to Pick a President," "In to Win," "Working for Change, Working for You," and "The strength and experience to make change happen."[19]

2012

Democratic Party candidates

"Forward" – 2012 U.S. Presidential slogan of Barack Obama.

Republican Party candidates

"Believe in America" – 2012 U.S. Presidential slogan of Mitt Romney.

"America's Comeback Team" – 2012 U.S. Presidential slogan of Mitt Romney after picking Paul Ryan as his running mate

"Obama Isn't Working" – slogan used by Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign, a takeoff of "Labour Isn't Working," a similar campaign previously used by the British Conservative Party

"Restore Our Future" – slogan used by Mitt Romney's 2012 campaign

"The Courage to Fight for America" -2012 U.S. presidential slogan of Rick Santorum.

"Restore America Now" – 2012 U.S. Presidential slogan of Ron Paul.

Libertarian Party candidates

"The People's President" – Gary Johnson campaign slogan

"Live Free" – Gary Johnson campaign slogan

Green Party candidates

"A Green New Deal for America" – Official slogan of the Jill Stein campaign

Constitution Party candidates

"Citizenship Matters" – Virgil Goode campaign slogan

2016

Republican Party candidates

"Make America Great Again!" – used by Donald Trump's campaign.[20]

"Promises Made, Promises Kept." – used by Donald Trump's campaign.

"A New American Century" – used by Marco Rubio's campaign.

"Courageous Conservatives" and "Reigniting the Promise of America" – used by Ted Cruz's campaign, also "TRUSTED," "A Time for Truth," and "Defeat the Washington Cartel"

"Jeb!", "Jeb can fix it," and "All in for Jeb" – used by Jeb Bush's campaign.[21] also "Right to Rise" and "Slow and Steady Wins the Race"[22]

"Heal. Inspire. Revive." – used by Ben Carson's campaign.

"From Hope to Higher Ground" – used by Mike Huckabee's campaign.[23]

"New Possibilities. Real Leadership." – used by Carly Fiorina's campaign.[20]

"Defeat the Washington Machine. Unleash the American Dream." – used by Rand Paul's campaign[24][25]

"Tanned, Rested, Ready."– used by Bobby Jindal's campaign

"Telling it like it is."– used by Chris Christie's campaign

"Kasich For America" or "Kasich For US" – used by John Kasich's campaign

Libertarian Party candidates

"Our Best America Yet!" – used by Gary Johnson's campaign

"Live Free" – used by Gary Johnson's campaign

"#TeamGov" – used by Gary Johnson's campaign

"Be Libertarian with me" – used by Gary Johnson's campaign

"You In?" – used by Gary Johnson's campaign

"Make America Sane Again" - common but unofficial slogan in support of Gary Johnson's campaign

"Taking over the government to leave everyone alone" - used by Austin Petersen's campaign

Democratic Party candidates

"A Future To Believe In" – used by Bernie Sanders' campaign, a common but unofficial slogan used by supporters was "Feel The Bern"

"Hillary For America" – used by Hillary Clinton's campaign

"Forward Together" – used by Hillary Clinton's campaign, on the side of her bus.

"Fighting for us" – used by Hillary Clinton's campaign

"I'm With Her" – used by Hillary Clinton's campaign

"Stronger Together" – used by Hillary Clinton's campaign

"When they go low, we go high" – used by Michelle Obama and adopted by Hillary Clinton's campaign[26]

"Love Trumps Hate" - used by Hillary Clinton's campaign

Green Party candidates

"It's in our hands" – used by Jill Stein's campaign.

Independents

"It's never too late to do the right thing" – used by Evan McMullin